Takikomi Gohan (Mixed Browned Rice)

Posted by on April 14, 2010 in Blog, Family Favorites, Japanese Cuisine Favorites, Rice & Sushi | 7 comments

Although I’m not a fan of plain ol’ white rice, I love my mom’s takikomi gohan or seasoned mixed rice.

The primary ingredients my mom uses for her takikomi gohan are chicken, carrots,  konnyaku, gobo, and shiitake mushrooms.  In Japanese, this type of mixed rice using 5 ingredients is called gomoku gohan.

If she has renkon she will add this too, or sometimes use this in place of gobo.  There are also times when she adds ageh, but usually she sticks to the 5 primary ingredients listed above.

When we ate takikomi gohan for dinner, my mom would serve this with sumashi jiru, a clear Japanese soup (recipe to follow in future post), pickled vegetables, and okazu.

I called my mom to ask her for this recipe and this was one of the rare dishes where she said in Japanese, “Hold on, no, let me call you back.  I’ll go find my recipe.”  WHAT!  I finally came across a dish where my mom uses a recipe, and didn’t just ramble off a bunch of ingredients for me to use in tekitou (arbitrary) amounts.

Mom’s Brown Rice Takikomi Gohan Recipe

  • 2 cups brown rice
  • 1 small chicken thigh (or 1/2 chicken breast)
  • 1/4 konnyaku
  • 1/3 carrot
  • 2 dried shiitake mushrooms
  • 2 pieces of gobo (each 1 1/2 inches long)
  • 2 tablespoons shoyu (soy sauce)
  • 1 tablespoon mirin (sweet sake)
  • 1 tablespoon cooking sake
  • 2 1/4 cup water (total, including reserved mushroom liquid) – according to your rice cooker’s measurement

Wash brown rice until water runs clear.  Drain, and let stand for 30 minutes.

Use 1 cup warm water to reconstitute dried shiitake mushrooms.  Let soak for about 15 minutes until the mushrooms are tender.  Reserve the soaking liquid.  Trim stalk, discard and slice cap lengthwise into thick strips.

Slice konnyaku block horizontally and then slice each piece into smaller rectangular pieces.  Be sure to buy the block of konnyaku rather than the konnyaku noodles.  Pictured below is package of the dehydrated shiitake mushrooms and block of konnyaku.  Both of these were purchased at Marukai.

Cut chicken into small bite-sized pieces.

Slice carrots horizontally and then cut each slice into quarters, making “little triangle shapes,” as my mom says.

Gobo isn’t pretty.  It’s hairy and has a thin brown skin.  Remove the skin by running the blade down the gobo in a downward sweeping motion.  It’s almost like scraping the skin off.  Sweep the blade away from you.

Only peel about 3 – 4 inches of the gobo and cut off the peeled portion.  Cut this into 2 pieces about 1 1/2 inches long.  Then slice each piece lengthwise into thin matchstick-sized pieces.  Soak in water until you’re ready to put them in the rice cooker.

Excluding the chicken, the chopped vegetables (shiitake, gobo, carrots, and konnyaku) combined should be about 3/4 cup.

Add all of the chopped ingredients into the rice cooker, including the raw chicken.  There are some recipes that suggest these ingredients be cooked prior to adding them to the rice, but all of the ingredients cook inside the rice cooker and meld all of the flavors together.  No undercooked chicken or vegetables – I promise!

In a separate bowl, measure out the reserved mushroom liquid (1 cup), plus 1 1/4 cup water, plus shoyu, mirin and sake.  The 3 magical ingredients for most of my mom’s dishes (and Japanese cooking in general) are shoyu, mirin and sake.

Again, lots of packaging with Japanese writing but don’t be intimidated to go shopping if you don’t read Japanese.  You’ll be able to find these.  :)

Pour all of the liquid ingredients into the rice cooker and cook rice as you normally would.

Because the vegetables increase the amount of liquid in the rice cooker as it cooks, the takikomi gohan will be a bit stickier than white rice.  My brother and I grew up eating stickier takikomi gohan because my dad prefers it like this, so we were used to my mom making it this way.  However, if you prefer takikomi gohan that is less sticky, consider using only 2 cups of water, but depending on your rice cooker you may end up with rice that is hard.  You might need to experiment a bit.

If you have questions or would like to leave me a comment, please don’t hesitate to do so!

Itadakimasu!

Judy | bebe mama

 

Takikomi Gohan (Mixed Browned Rice)
Author: 
Recipe type: Side Dish
 
Ingredients
  • 2 cups brown rice
  • 1 small chicken thigh (or ½ chicken breast)
  • ¼ konnyaku
  • ⅓ carrot
  • 2 dried shiitake mushrooms
  • 2 pieces of gobo (each 1½ inches long)
  • 2 tablespoons shoyu (soy sauce)
  • 1 tablespoon mirin (sweet sake)
  • 1 tablespoon cooking sake
  • 2¼ cup water (total, including reserved mushroom liquid) - according to your rice cooker's measurement
Instructions
  1. Wash brown rice until water runs clear.  Drain, and let stand for 30 minutes.
  2. Use 1 cup warm water to reconstitute dried shiitake mushrooms.  Let soak for about 15 minutes until the mushrooms are tender.  Reserve the soaking liquid.  Trim stalk, discard and slice cap lengthwise into thick strips.
  3. Slice konnyaku block horizontally and then slice each piece into smaller rectangular pieces.
  4. Cut chicken into small bite-sized pieces.
  5. Slice carrots horizontally and then cut each slice into quarters, making "little triangle shapes", as my mom would say.
  6. Remove the skin of the gobo by running the blade down the gobo in a downward sweeping motion.  It's almost like scraping the skin off.  Sweep the blade away from you.
  7. Only peel about 3 - 4 inches of the gobo and cut off the peeled portion.  Cut this into 2 pieces about 1½ inches long.  Then slice each piece lengthwise into thin matchstick-sized pieces.  Soak in water until you're ready to put them in the rice cooker.
  8. Excluding the chicken, the chopped vegetables (shiitake, gobo, carrots, and konnyaku) combined should be about ¾ cup.
  9. Add all of the chopped ingredients into the rice cooker, including the raw chicken.  There are some recipes that suggest these ingredients be cooked prior to adding them to the rice, but all of the ingredients cook inside the rice cooker and meld all of the flavors together.
  10. In a separate bowl, measure out the reserved mushroom liquid (1 cup), plus 1¼ cup water, plus shoyu, mirin and sake.
  11. Pour all of the liquid ingredients into the rice cooker and cook rice as you normally would.
  12. Because the vegetables increase the amount of liquid in the rice cooker as it cooks, the takikomi gohan will be a bit stickier than white rice.  If you prefer takikomi gohan that is less sticky, consider using only 2 cups of water, but depending on your rice cooker you may end up with rice that is hard.  You might need to experiment a bit.

7 Comments

  1. avatar

    WOW! Finally got around to taki komi gohan, huh? My favorite homemade dish! I dunno why, but it’s so damn good!! I asked my mom to make this for my birthday, as you may remember! LOL My mom said, such a simple request! :) Win-Win for everyone!

    • avatar

      Yes, I know! FINALLY! I can only post as quickly as bebe E allows. :) I should compare my mommy’s recipe with your mommy’s recipe.
      BTW, remember the request you made a few weeks ago? Well, I might finally get to making that tonight. We’ll see if I can post it over the next few days. :)

  2. avatar

    Waaaah thank you so much for this recipe! It is exactly what I was looking for and I can’t wait to try it. :D

    • avatar

      I’m glad I could help. I hope the takikomi gohan turns out to your liking. Thanks for stopping by! Cheers! :)

      • avatar

        No problem, I’m so glad I found your site! I’m actually going to make this tonight but I realized something last night while looking at the recipe. Are you sure the brown rice and water measurements are correct? Because when I make normal brown rice (on the stovetop) I use 1 cup of rice and 2 cups of water. I was planning to just use 4 cups of water but then I thought I’d ask just in case you replied in time… Thanks!

        • avatar

          Yikes, I’m not sure about stovetop measurements. I used a rice cooker to make this, and I went by the measurements that are engraved on the inside of the cooker. Usually, when I make rice with our rice cooker, if I add 2 cups of brown rice, I only add water up to the “2″ marker in the rice cooker, however, I’m certain that it is more than a measuring cup. I added extra water because of all of the ingredients. The rule of thumb I used to use when making stovetop rice was to add enough water so that the water above the rice came up to the first line in your index finger (from your finger tip). The rule my mom gave me for adding water to the rice cooker was to make sure the water level above all the ingredients was about 1/2 inch to 3/4 inches. I hope this helps. If you use 2:4 on the stove, I would stick to what you normally do, but add a little extra water b/c you’ll have a lot of extra ingredients in there. I’ll have to clarify my measurements.

  3. avatar

    Wow, thanks for all the advice! :) I actually didn’t see your post in time (even though you replied so fast!) but I decided to just make the rice as I usually do while adding the extra ingredients. And it came out great! It was super delicious and so easy. I always thought it would be hard to do so we used boxed mixes. x/ I won’t be getting those anymore! Thank you thank you THANK YOU!

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