Niku Jyaga (Japanese Simmered Beef & Potatoes)

Posted by on April 12, 2010 in Beef, Blog, Family Favorites, Japanese Cuisine Favorites | 8 comments

 

Niku Jyaga - 1a

Niku Jyaga is a regular dish that my mom made for us and it was definitely a family favorite when I was growing up.  It’s the Japanese equivalent of America’s meat and potatoes.

I’m not sure what it is about men and their meat and potatoes but my dad LOVES this dish, and so does bebe dada. It’s light enough however, that it will even suit the palate of young kids and possibly even women who don’t care for meat and potatoes.

Last night I decided to make niku jyaga for dinner.  Comfort food.

I like to store shabu-shabu beef which is thinly sliced and very tender, in our freezer.  I also like to keep a pack of ito konyaku in the fridge, which might seem like a random item to have on hand, but it keeps really well and big onechan and I love this stuff.

My mom’s niku jyaga consists of thinly sliced beef, onions, potatoes and ito konyaku.

Konnyaku

Mom’s Niku Jyaga

  • 3 small red potatoes (or 2 small Idaho potatoes)
  • 1 small onion
  • 1/3 pound shabu-shabu (very thinly sliced) rib-eye beef
  • 8 oz ito konyaku (yam noodles)

for simmering sauce:

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 ¼ teaspoon katsuo dashi (bonito seasoning base)
  • 5 to 6 tablespoons shoyu (soy sauce), to taste
  • 2 tablespoons cooking sake
  • 2 tablespoons mirin (sweet sake)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar

1) In a medium pot, combine simmering ingredients and bring to a boil, reduce to medium-low heat.

2) Peel and cut potatoes and let soak in water.  They’ll turn reddish-brown if you don’t soak them.

3) Cut onions vertically to make rough chop pieces.

4) Drain and rinse ito konyaku (yam noodles).  Using kitchen shears, cut ito konyaku into shorter pieces.  Note: If you don’t cut them you might find 10″ noodles you’ll need to wrangle with when you eat.

5) Slice beef into bite-sized pieces.

I used to buy shabu-shabu meat in West Los Angeles from a Japanese market called Safe & Save, but they sadly went out of business.  They had the thinnest, most tender, most delicious shabu-shabu beef.

6) First, add the beef and onions to the simmering sauce and cook for 5 – 7 minutes until cooked.

7) Next, add ito konyaku to the simmering sauce and cook for about 10 minutes.  It takes a bit of time for the konyaku to absorb the flavor of the simmering sauce.

8) Finally, add the potatoes to the simmering sauce and cook for 10 – 15 minutes until potatoes are tender. Note: Be careful not to over-simmer the niku jyaga else the potatoes will begin to disintegrate. Also, if you over-simmer the ingredients, your dish will become saltier as the shoyu (soy sauce) cooks down.

Itadakimasu!

Judy | bebe mama

Niku Jyaga (Japanese Simmered Beef & Potatoes)
Author: 
Recipe type: Main
 
Ingredients
  • 3 small red potatoes (or 2 small Idaho potatoes)
  • 1 small onion
  • ⅓ pound shabu-shabu (very thinly sliced) rib-eye beef
  • 8 oz ito konyaku (yam noodles)
  • FOR SIMMERING SAUCE:
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 ¼ teaspoon katsuo dashi (bonito seasoning base)
  • 5 to 6 tablespoons shoyu (soy sauce), to taste
  • 2 tablespoons cooking sake
  • 2 tablespoons mirin (sweet sake)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
Instructions
  1. In a medium pot, combine simmering ingredients and bring to a boil, reduce to medium-low heat.
  2. Peel and cut potatoes and let soak in water. They’ll turn reddish-brown if you don’t soak them.
  3. Cut onions vertically to make rough chop pieces.
  4. Drain and rinse ito konyaku (yam noodles). Using kitchen shears, cut ito konyaku into shorter pieces.
  5. Slice beef into bite-sized pieces.
  6. First, add the beef and onions to the simmering sauce and cook for 5 - 7 minutes until cooked.
  7. Next, add ito konyaku to the simmering sauce and cook for about 10 minutes. It takes a bit of time for the konyaku to absorb the flavor of the simmering sauce.
  8. Finally, add the potatoes to the simmering sauce and cook for 10 - 15 minutes until potatoes are tender.
  9. Note: Be careful not to over-simmer the niku jyaga else the potatoes will begin to disintegrate. Also, if you over-simmer the ingredients, your dish will become saltier as the shoyu (soy sauce) cooks down.

8 Comments

  1. avatar

    Yea, popular japanese dish. I don’t think my mom really made this. Maybe she did, and I never asked what the name of it was. LOL I know Yuko cooks this often for James. :) LOL I will have to try making this one day, since I’ve gotta cook dinner. :)

    Thanks for sharing your fave recipes!!

    • avatar

      You’re welcome, and thanks again for visiting! It’s really a simple dish and I’m sure Winter will love this too!

  2. avatar

    Trying this recipe tonight for dinner. I don’t have all the ingredients but I’m gonna improvise and see how it comes out!! :)

    • avatar

      Oooh, exciting!!! I’ll look forward to hearing how it turns out! :)

  3. avatar

    Niku Jyaga turned out pretty good! Kekko oishikatta yo!! Now I have a lot of leftover, which is good. Brought it to work to eat for lunch today! Tanoshimi!! It was a lil bland, so, I poured shoyu when I ate it. I didn’t have mirin, so I left it out and also, ito konnyaku mo nakatta. Demo aji wa kekko oishikatta! :)

    A few more requests I thought of: Kyuri no suno mono oh…what was the other one….wasureta…..I’ll let you know when I remember. :)

    • avatar

      Thanks for trying it out! Sorry to hear you had to add shoyu. When I made it kekko pah-fec-to deshita. LOL. I also recommend tasting while you cook. That way you can add any extra ingredients as necessary to make the niku jyaga perfect to suite your palate. :)

      Kyuri and wakame sunomono is posted under “vegetables & salad”. We make ours sweet b/c that’s the way mom makes it. If you like it more tart, cut the sugar and add more vinegar and/or lemon. :)

  4. avatar

    hello i just saw this blog today and right now cooking niku jyaga, smell is good but i think it looks like a soup ;), anyway, will try it and write you ! have a good day and thank you for recipe.

    • avatar

      Hi there, thank you for stopping by for a visit. The liquid should simmer off a little bit while you cook it, but when you serve it, you don’t serve it with the simmering liquid. Just take out the food from the simmering sauce and serve. I hope your dish turns out! :)

Please Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Rate this recipe: